What the Tech!?!?

Dear Jon…

Every day, I am asked all sorts of tech questions. Some arrive in our email, others are in person, at my shop. I have picked a few of my favourite questions to share in this month’s What the Tech!?!?

SSD: The speed boost

 

 

Rachel S. asks: What is SSD all about?

SSD stands for ‘Solid State Drive,’ the memory chip technology that you find in your smartphone, or a digital camera card. Most recently, SSD has been introduced into notebook computers, and it is a game changer, offering you a huge speed boost, allowing the computer to be thinner, and providing better battery life. SSD drives also allow portable machines to be moved while running with no risk of damage to the drive. So, if you have an option for SSD, and it is within your budget, it is a great choice for either a new computer or an upgrade to your current machine.

 

 

 

Most recently, SSD has been introduced into notebook computers, and it is a game changer

SSD drives also allow portable machines to be moved while running with no risk of damage to the drive. So, if you have an option for SSD, and it is within your budget, it is a great choice for either a new computer or an upgrade to your current machine.

Stephen P. asks: Do I really need Microsoft Office?

This is a tricky one to answer because it is not just a yes or no answer, it is more like a maybe. I say this because, in the last few years, a number of other solutions have arrived on the market, and can easily replace Office. One very popular choice is Google Docs, which can replace Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint, and which also offers both an online and offline mode that syncs between different devices.

Options exist, whether you prefer Microsoft Office or Apple-compatible software

Similar to Google Docs, if you have an Apple ID, then you can use iWork in the cloud. Just login to iCloud.com, and you have access to Pages, Numbers, and Keynote. Again, syncs to different devices, and can be used on a Windows PC, as well as a Mac. The other suggestion I often share is OpenOffice. Like the other two options, this is also a free program. Once installed on your computer, you have access to a word processor, a spreadsheet program, and a few other built-in programs. If these solutions don’t meet your needs, I would suggest Office 365 30-day trial, so you can try before you buy.

The other suggestion I often share is OpenOffice. Like the other two options, this is also a free program. Once installed on your computer, you have access to a word processor, a spreadsheet program, and a few other built-in programs.

The HD or iCloud dilemma

 

Dave F. asks: What’s better to have – a backup hard drive or a cloud backup?

You would really want to have both. When your computer hard drive dies (and it will), you want to restore it as fast as possible, and with a local backup hard drive (like in your house or office), you can plug it into the computer and get back up and running in a short time frame.

 

 

 

 

A cloud backup (considered a fail-safe) is used in case your local backup hard drive breaks, gets stolen, is damaged, or burns down in a fire.

Cloud restore is not fast, but at least your data will still be accessible, and in time, it will all be back on the computer, however, restoring a cloud backup will highly depend on internet download speeds.

If you’e looking for answers, feel free to submit questions to info@allabouttech.ca.

SaveSave

SaveSave

Leave a Reply

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.